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Why Supreme Court justices serve such long terms

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Vative

An even better option would be to let the most senior acting judge in a Federal court of appeals automatically be promoted to fill a Supreme Court vacancy for life. This way both President + Congress would find it even harder to tinker with SCOTUS appointments regardless of partisanship.

CA-Oxonian

Interestingly enough, if we envisage a system of governance that does away with so-called "representatives" (who in fact don't represent their constituents at all, but instead are mere salespeople for whatever policies their Party claims to represent at any point in time) and does away with the idea that no matter how foolish or ignorant you are, your vote is just as valid as that of a thoughtful and informed person, we see that the question of highly politicized judges disappears.

So rather than tinkering with a fundamentally flawed system, we should instead be considering replacing it altogether. It cannot be argued that our present approach to governance is anything other than a total catastrophe. If something isn't working it really is time to fix it rather than live in a perpetual state of denial. It's long past time we abandoned "the Churchill defense" and moved on. After all, we expect continuous improvement in most aspects of our lives; why should we not expect it in the most important aspect of all?

CA-Oxonian

Interestingly enough, if we envisage a system of governance that does away with so-called "representatives" (who in fact don't represent their constituents at all, but instead are mere salespeople for whatever policies their Party claims to represent at any point in time) and does away with the idea that no matter how foolish or ignorant you are, your vote is just as valid as a thoughtful and informed person, we see that the question of highly politicized judges disappears.

So rather than tinkering with a fundamentally flawed system, we should instead be considering replacing it altogether. It cannot be argued that our present approach to governance is anything other than a total catastrophe. If something isn't working it really is time to fix it rather than live in a perpetual state of denial. It's long past time we abandoned "the Churchill defense" and moved on. After all, we expect continuous improvement in most aspects of our lives; why should we not expect it in the most important aspect of all?

homocidalmaniac

This article may present many important points but its ideological bias diminishes the strength of its argument. That is a shame.
I don't want to be told what to think but will make my own decisions based on the evidence.

ashbird

It is true no USSC Justice has ever been impeached except Chase who subsequently was acquitted and continued to serve until his death.
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However, behaviors that are regarded as over the top egregious still could have consequences, a precedent being in 1969, Justice Abe Fortas resigned under threat of impeachment hearings. Fortas was appointed to the bench in 1965; he was found to have accepted a position from a foundation to provide counsel for $20,000 annually for life. The foundation was run by the family of a Wall Street titan who was later charged and found guilty of securities violation.
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So don't worry, whoever is Trump's appointee will likewise face Fortas' end (Fortas incidentally wrote some brilliant USSC opinions, not a half-mute like one sitting as one of 9 who'd automatically concur with Scalia whatever Scalia wrote before Scalia died) if he/she follows his/her Commander In Chief's footsteps. Not all people in America is an idiot.

ashbird in reply to k. r. gardner

Still do. I evaluate judges by their legal reasoning, not whether or not I agree with their conclusion.
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Unless that is the yardstick, then all justices would just be an extended arm of the individual who appoints them. If the country descends to that low a nadir in its Judicial Branch, then the country has no one to blame but itself.

Vative in reply to ashbird

Impeachment hinges on behaviour that simply can't be ignored. If Trump was able to select an ok judge such as Gorsuch, why do you seem so sure that his next appointment is going to behave in such an outrageous way that this new appointee will face a fate similar to Fortas?