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The bullies of Urumqi

The extraordinary ways in which China humiliates Muslims

Bans on “abnormal” beards and even the name “Muhammad”

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Kouroi

Now knowing how the U.S. and KSA are sponsoring religious fervor as a way to create political opposition to regimes it wants to overthrow (Afghanistan, Syria, Egypt, Lybia, etc...), one cannot condemn the Chinese for fighting fire by removing the Oxygen...

Vesicant

The West should wake up and learn from China's practices to protect its citizens from the violent, brainwashed members of the cult of Islam. The sooner the better.

east wind

The War for the Hearts n Minds === It's SUFI VS SALAFI in Xinjiang

China is lucky that the Uighers are Sufi Muslims n NOT Salafi Islam

The Sufism Islam is the most moderate form of Islam == It is the most similar to Christianity among all Muslim sects

SUFISM ISLAM communicate with their God thru dance, music, literature n the Arts

SALAFISM ISLAM is the type that ISIS n terrorist jihadists practise

NOW....IN Xinjiang the battle between Sufism n Salafism begins as the Salafis tries to convert the Sufis over

China takes neccessary measures to prevent the radicalization of Sufism by the Salafi Fotces

In 1970, Saudi Arabia Salafism had vowed that it will exterminate n wioe out SUfism from the face of the world

The truth is that SUFISM ISLAM religious leaders in Xinjiang are advising the Chinese Govt on how to block the ISIS fanatism Islam from penetrating Xinjiang

east wind in reply to guest-nawmoln

The syrian Govt reported that there are 5000 Uighers fighting for ISIS

HELLOOOOOOO,,,..... only 5000 Uighers out of 8,000,000 Uighers in Xinjiang are joining ISIS

And 8,000,000 Uighers will not dream of going against 1,340,000,000 Han Chinese

Uighers are NOT suicidal as yet

China can very easily send in 20,000,000 Peoples Militia Army to crush any traitors in Xinjiang who commit TREASON

guest-nawmoln in reply to east wind

that's because Chinese government took away Uigher's freedom to travel by not issuing them passports.

If they can travel to Syria at will, ISIS will have millions of new members.

You clearly grow up in a very secular, left household. Believe me, those people have a very different world view. They don't care about their life in this world - everything they do is to prepare themselves for the afterlife. People like you and me generally hesitate a little bit before blowing ourselves up in a crowded market place, or fly airplanes into buildings. They don't

Fourierr

Noteworthy that The Economist never has any news headline that says "The extraordinary ways in which Islam/Muslims humiliates Atheists/Buddhists/Christians/Hindus/Jews".
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I guess The Religion of Peace and Tolerance never does any such thing -- as far as the western elites are concerned.

Fourierr

Fun to watch how the Central Kingdom deals with the Religion of Peace and Tolerance, and vice versa.

Fxr91sd943kjieb

Did ISIS provide this to TE? Does the author need to cite a source? I was reading the article thinking wow this is really comprehensive CIA (or better!) quality information--but how much is true? It certainly rings true as all good propaganda does.
The only way anyone could have gotten this detailed a story is from some local sources connected with intelligence. I thought of the two gentlemen cited: " reckon James Leibold of La Trobe University and Adrian Zenz of the European School of Culture and Theology at Korntal, Germany."
The reason I wonder on its veracity is a recent book I read by Paul Theroux describing life in Ürümqi it doesn't exactly jive with this article's type scenario... e.g. hotels full of hookers and gay bars crowds. So I guess being moslem is the mistake people make. Maybe? No place I want to go visit any time soon.

guest-isoimww

I lived one year in Xinjiang. My Uyghur is very bad, I don't pretend I speak it, but at least I learned a few words like hello, thanks, and the numbers. The Uyghur always appreciated when I made an effort to speak it. I must say that the vast majority of the Chinese (or Han) that I met in Xinjiang did not know a single word in Uyghur or maybe they pretended that they knew nothing.
I think that if only the Chinese started to make some little efforts like saying hello in Uyghur to their neighbours that would be a better benefits than any anti-terrorist policies that the government can make. (In others words, they need more building bridges between the communities than anti-terrorists measures.)

RJ Hanley in reply to guest-isoimww

In my couple of weeks in Xinjiang last year I only got up to 3 or so local words, and probably only about 10 Mandarin for the other couple of months in the rest of the country. I fear it's beyond me to learn much more without immersion, unfortunately. Oh, to be 4 or 5 years old and have the opportunity to learn a few languages! Thanks be for translation apps, mime and people's patience and kindness.

Re the 'outsiders' not learning the local language: many of us are guilty of it, I suspect. How many in Britain, other than the Welsh, speak any Welsh? Or Gaelic, or Cornish? Bugger all, of course, and I doubt that more than a tiny few have any interest in learning them. In my country, how many other than the Pitjantjatjara, Wiradjuri, Gurindji, Ngaanyatjarra, or any others of the speakers of the many indigenous languages that still survive, know a single word? Probably only the ones I know are place names, sadly.

It's the same story in any number of other places, like Canada, the US, Brazil, Peru, etc etc. Perhaps we shouldn't be so quick to judge the Chinese or Han. There's plenty of cultural ignorance and laziness to go round.

canabana in reply to RJ Hanley

Just visited Xinjiang a month ago for the second time. Security is definitely tight comparing to ten years ago when I was there. Never gone through such a thorough body check at the Diwopu Airport in Urumqi.

But yes, language barrier does create misunderstandings. The good thing is unlike ten years ago when children could choose the language their parents wanted their kids to study in, the new policy is now all students starting school must learn both Pudonghua (Mandarin) and Uyghur, bilingual..

I noticed those Uyghurs who could speak Pudonghua have no problem working along side the Hans, including those working for the government and airport officials.
Hopefully a generation from now, there will be very little misunderstandings due to language problem, although inter marriage is still rare where the Uyghurs parents forbid their children from marrying Hans.
Yea.. I know... the Hans consume a lot of pork and not enough lamb :).

JAIHA in reply to canabana

"the new policy is now all students starting school must learn both Pudonghua (Mandarin) and Uyghur, bilingual"
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That would be progress indeed. Do you have any links to proof that?
Most likely I'll visit Xinjiang this summer, so I will find out for myself shortly but anyway...
'
Does that policy apply in Tibet as well? Do Han students in Tibet have to learn Tibetan from yr 1 now?
You should post that information to Nancy Pelosi:
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/china/china-objects-to-us-congr...

RJ Hanley in reply to JAIHA

"Most likely I'll visit Xinjiang this summer..."
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A tip: Security is tight there, but it's still easy to get caught out even if you are aware of that, as I'm sure you are. While trying to board a train from Turpan to Urumqi, my suitcase was scanned (as normal), but the eagle-eyed inspector picked up a small pocket knife tucked away in it, which I'd pretty much forgotten I had, and refused to let me go through without surrendering it. I, foolishly, blew my top, because the item had strong sentimental/family value. I would've given it up otherwise. Fortunately, I was with a new friend from Taiwan, who spoke the language and was able to mediate, and we reached a solution.
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When leaving Kashgar a couple of weeks later, and almost running late for my flight because of illness, an airport security guy refused to let me take my small tripod in my carry-on backpack, as I'd done without any issue on planes and trains all through China and Xinjiang. "Check in, no carry on". So: fuming, hot, severely dehydrated and woozy, I had to chase around searching for someone to wrap it and check it in, which I finally managed, only to get to the boarding gate a few minutes late, missing my flight to Chengdu via Urumqi. Fortunately, they hadn't loaded my baggage on the plane when I hadn't boarded, and after another hour of chasing around, I was able to retrieve it, book a new flight for the next day, and head back to town to check back in to my hotel. ROYAL PAIN in the A**E!!

JAIHA in reply to canabana

I can't find any passage in the link which indicates that Han students have to learn Uyghur. Instead it states:
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"Since the mid-1980s the Uyghur-Chinese bilingual education has been encouraged in Uyghur schools. In 2004 the Xinjiang regional government promulgated a regional directive asserting that Mandarin Chinese should be used as the primary or sole language of instruction of all primary and secondary schools in Xinjiang (Ministry of Education, 2004).
...
Thus in Xinjiang the Han students are encouraged to become bilingual in Chinese and English, while the Uyghur students are primarily encouraged to become bilingual in their mother tongue Uyghur (L1) and Mandarin Chinese (L2), then possibly in English (L3)."
'
It does talk about bilingual education, Uyghur-Chinese for Uyghur students and Mandarin-English for Han students.
And it claims that Mandarin has replaced their own mother-tongue as primary language for instruction as far as Uyghur students are concerned which is bilingual education of the colonizers' kind.
'
I'm afraid but your claim doesn't seem to hold water. Was your tour guide Han or Uyghur?
Well, I'll be travelling without tour guide anyway, and I'll definitely find out from the locals, now that you've raised the issue. Will get back to you about it sometime later...

JAIHA in reply to canabana

I also wonder whether it would really make sense to make *all* students start with both Mandarin and Uyghur (in whichever sequence)? Xinjiang has so many other ethnic groups, apart from Han and Uyghurs...
Is it sensible for Tajik children to learn Uyghur rather than their mother tongue?
It seems more localized solutions would be appropriate, with Mandarin and Uyghur both being lingua franca in the Uyghur Autonomous Province.
'
In fact, this whole discrimination by ethnicity seems as deplorable and outdated to me as the caste system in India. Both systems are being abused. Why discriminate citizens randomly on such lines? Let communities organize their schooling locally and stop treating the question as a political issue. I know that's a big ask in China but that's how nature organizes itself - bottom-up rather than top-down.
'
Indian states, particularly in the South, have largely been formed along linguistic lines. Children in Kerala start school with Malayalam, in Karnataka with Kannada, in Tamil Nadu with Tamil, and so forth.
Parents from interstate, as well as locals, can also send their kids to an English medium school if they like.
Most people in South India speak a handful of languages.
So it's entirely possible, even though I appreciate that the ethnic/linguistic mix in W China is more complex than the situation in India.

guest-aawljwoi in reply to JAIHA

Usually, there are three kinds of schools for Uyghur students in Xinjiang. The first one called "Bilingual" teaches Uyghur in the language course and uses Mandarin in other courses like math, science, etc.. The second one only uses Mandarin. The last one only uses Uyghur. Students can choose anyone they like. However, due to the economic reason, the first two types are more popular in the more developed areas (cities or northern Xinjiang), while the less developed areas ( rural or southern Xinjiang) have more the last type of schools. In China, all minority ethnic students are given extra bonus points in the exam for entering college to promote their education. The students using "Bilingual" are even given more bonus points, considering that they may have difficulty in learning languages. More and more people who see the outside world and start to know the modern society are willing to send their children to learn Mandarin. They want to enjoy the fruit of economic development of China. However, Uyghur people are divided due to this school system. Students who take the last type of school discriminate against those taking the first types of schools and think that they are not true Uyghur. Some even call learning Mandarin as "eating pig milk". In the less developed area like Kashgar, the schools' condition is poor while people spend their money to build mosques. I just read an article. It said that there are 10,000 mosques (1/4 of the whole China) in Kasgar Prefecture. The population of Kasgar Prefecture is 4 million. This means every 400 people, including some non-muslin Han Chinese, have one mosque. Additionally, most people can not speak Mandarin and are marginalized in China. The result is that the religion takes over the place. Islam extremism is growing due to the penetration of middle east countries and ISIS. Terrorism attacks against not only Han but also Uyghur have happened a lot in recent years. Recently, the government changed the policy and started to only use Mandarin in the schools of southern Xinjiang. Xinjiang starts to recruit lots of teachers from other provinces and promise much higher salary than average. Lacking Mandarin teachers is a problem because people worry about the poor economic situation, harsh desert environment, and security condition of southern Xinjiang. However, there are also people with strong obligations or having no other better choices are willing to stay there.

Ruth S.

I'm not a nationalist, not one of the right-wing and has long been a fan of TE. But this time TE should have done better homework on Muslim issues. Nowadays it's the Han people (majority ethnic) that are being bullied by the Muslims, even in provinces other than Xinjiang. Why France bans Burqa? I guess they have a similar reason.
Be left but not too far-left. Or we might not survive to speak for ourselves.

Fxr91sd943kjieb in reply to Ruth S.

TE was reborn as a center left MSM publication---solidly PC pro moslem pro open borders pro climate change action poop sheet about 20 years ago....gotten worse lately. The only right wingers left are a few stalwart oldies (64) like me. The article seemed like it was professionally written by ISIS (or some lefty western intelligence operation) so your comment was very interesting to me.

Vanliso

Of course, a LA LA land for everyone sounds desirable.

Condemning is always easy than making meaningful suggestion.

Eurostan is certainly not an option to Chinese. It's interesting to see the such articles while the British people voted to Brexit to escape from that perspective. Yea, Europe has once wholly embraced Catholics in old times, then no big trouble to another religion now, right? No offence.

SAS

I have nothing against China or its people, but these reprehensible restrictions need to STOP !

alex65 in reply to alex65

...and "Mujahid" is also banned. How about that!
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Had TE listed all the banned names people would have seen the whole picture instead of the partial picture delivered on a silver platter and used to fit its narrative.
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Are the omissions an oversight or intentional?

JAIHA in reply to alex65

Quote from the article:
"A leaked list of banned names includes Muhammad, Mecca and Saddam. "
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I don't see what's wrong with that statement. The point being that Muhammad or Saddam are perfectly common Muslim names. As so often, China overreacts and thus causes an avoidable backlash, be it in Tibet or Xinjiang.
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More details as usual to be found on CDT:
http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2017/04/xinjiang-authorities-ban-extreme-mu...
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At least Tibetans protest China's heavy hand by suicide rather than homicide. Obviously it takes an incredible amount of shaming, though, before anything changes with China's repressive policies...
How many Tibetans have already killed themselves up to now?
149, and counting...
http://www.phayul.com/news/article.aspx?id=39008&article=Tibetan+youth+s...
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Certainly information about these events being firmly swept under the carpet is not an oversight on China's part but entirely intentional.
It shows, though, that even the CPC cares about saving face. Maybe the shaming will one day make a difference after all...
I salute those brave Tibetans. While I can't say whether it's right or wrong what they're doing, one has to commend their spirit.
Reminds me of a documentary I saw decades ago...
https://www.amazon.com/Tibet-Survival-Spirit-Clemens-Kuby/dp/6303504248

alex65 in reply to JAIHA

"I don't see what's wrong with that statement."
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I see everything wrong with that statement because it cherry-picks facts to suit its narrative. This makes a difference between honest journalism and propaganda making.

JAIHA in reply to alex65

There's all kinds of journalism. And we both know where TE stands. The Economist is entirely open about it, right?
Advocacy journalism happens to be partial. Sometimes I wonder why you read TE when you don't enjoy it...
'
As it is, the comment threads on China related articles here have pretty much withered since TE got blocked in China and I increasingly stray into the comment section of the Times of India these days if I want to have a laugh...
'
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/china/china-objects-to-us-congr...

guest-590bd88f94e85

Since when are the Muslims (Turks) considered "white"? If that were the case then Turkey would be in EEC now!

The Europeans did a creepy yet brutal invasion of American Indian lands. And they are the greatest country in the world... USA! Why shouldn't the white invaders of China be allowed the same "facility" as the Europeans in the new world? Israel claims and occupies parts of Palestine. Is it OK for some but not for others?

guest-nlijile

Please educate yourselves about the fact that Muslim Uyghurs are one of the Maoist regime's other sources of healthy organs for their most heinous crime against humanity, state-sanctioned live forced organ harvesting of prisoners of conscience, to fill their booming organs on demand industry. The other sources include some Christian groups (probably Jehovah's Witnesses, who don't believe in giving their allegiance to any government), Tibetans, and mainly practitioners of the Buddhist meditative exercise Falun Gong aka Falun Dafa, very similar to yoga and Tai Chi. They have been persecuted since 1999 as ordered by Jiang Zemin, who also ordered the following year that they be slaughtered for their organs.

Senior Prof

Americans have trouble understanding the situation since we have no parallel. The Uighers are White Indo-Europeans, accepted as Turks and given asylum by Turkey. They are the descendants of the great Muslim armies that conquered Persia, Turkey and India, but stalled in Xinjiang while invading China. Nobody disputes that they are the descendants of White colonialists who invaded an Asian civilization that had already been in existence for some 1800 years.  The closest analogy to the Uigher situation, then, would be if White British colonialists continued to occupy Hong Kong, claiming that the Chinese who want it back are stealing it from them, instead of vice versa. When China took Hong Kong back it didn't kick out the British who were living there. When China regained control of Xinjiang, the Uighers also remained. They are not Chinese who have converted to Islam, as Western reporters seem to think. (Chinese who converted to Islam are called the Hui.  They're not white, and they're normal patriotic Chinese.)  The Uighers are a unique case, still defiantly a White Western race and culture, descended from the Turkic invaders, still hostile to the Chinese they invaded, still trying to capture that land for Islam. If there were still White British in Hong Kong claiming it for England, that would be the parallel. The Uighers aren't fools. They have learned to call themselves a "minority" when speaking to the Western press, which instantly makes Westerners think of oppressed minorities, like African Americans.  But Uighers are the descendants of an invading White colonial army, not the descendants of slaves. They're not fighting for civil rights, like African Americans, but, as they themselves clearly state, to revive and complete the Turkish Moslem imperial conquest, and turn the province of Xinjiang into an independent White Muslim state, which they call East Turkestan. That's White imperialism of an Asian race, and colonialism. If you don't think the British colonialists deserved to keep Hong Kong, you can't agree with the Uigher colonialist claims. What's more, every time China has been invaded by foreigners the Uighers living in China have sided with the invaders and tried to renew their old conquest, asking the invaders to turn Xinjiang into East Turkestan. During the brutal Japanese invasion which killed tens of millions of Chinese, they rose up and collaborated with the Japanese, asking for their Moslem colony in return for turning traitor. The grateful Japanese set up a little puppet state for the Uighers, as they did in Manchuria, in return for their collaboration. (Why the "Mother" of the Uighers kissed the ground at Yasukuni.) When Japan was defeated, the Uighers lost their Japanese allies, and China got Xinjiang back. China kicking out the Japanese is what the Uighers dare to call the conquest of their independent country by China. They count on Western ignorance of this very strange situation, the descendants of a White imperialist army marooned inside China, declaring that the land they once colonized, which had been part of China for 1800 years when they arrived, is theirs by right. There is no moral argument that can be made for White colonialism in China, whether it comes from the White Christian British or from these White Moslem Turks.  

Fred Schaff in reply to Senior Prof

since my use of "Han" to describe the mainstream Chinese was called "Racist", the above should be called a "Very Racist" description but, actually, its a very good description of the situation (the best I've ever seen). However, its an excellent description of the efforts by central -- ethnic Chinese -- Chinese government to pacify -- at any cost -- the outer provinces of "Greater China". As a Westerner visiting and of Xinjiang, Tibet and/or Inner Mongolia, I have to continue to wonder who's "Right" and if it will ever be settled without major loss of life on both sides.

RJ Hanley in reply to Senior Prof

"White"? What the hell does that highly loose, highly loaded, fundamentally vague term mean, anyway??? Given that you mentioned it I-don't-know-how-many-times, it must have some specific significance that you can precisely delineate? No, thought not. "White" is a political term, employed by the sort of folks who go on to talk about the "White Race", and nothing more.

Besides, in that part of the world, the folks who look most "white" are not Uighers but Tajiks, of whom I met a few in Kashgar and Tashkurgan, and they are most closely related to/derived from Persians - and I highly doubt that the vast majority of westerners of any stripe are likely to talk about Iranians as "white". Do you? No, thought not.

Those sort of terms are basically meaningless and calculated to be emotive, not educative. Using them says that you write with an Agenda, not to deal in precision. If you want to talk about ethnicity, then be specific, be sensitive and aware that you don't know more about Them than they know about Themselves. And ditch the Agenda.

Senior Prof in reply to Fred Schaff

Thank you, Fred. I start writing comments when, at semester's end, I'm too weary to face reviewing the two unopened books staring at me accusingly from my desk. Writer's block isn't not writing things, it's writing the wrong things.
You use the standard term "Han," and get called a Racist. I protest "White imperialism of an Asian race, and colonialism" and get called a white Racist. We must update Andy Warhol. By the 2020s, everybody will be called a Racist for fifteen minutes. Have a good weekend.

guest-isoimww in reply to Senior Prof

I must say that I am bit stunned by the comments. I have some difficulties of thinking about Whites or Yellows especially in the case of Xinjiang since it is a area that saw a lot of mixing of people over the years. Saying that, the most European look like people that lived in the area were the Tocharians and not the Uyghur. They spoke an Indo-European language and like some of their descendants today, some had blue eyes.
Uyghurs came to Xinjiang only around the X century AD and at that time they were not Muslims at that time. Previously their Empire was based more around Mongolia and they fled to Xinjiang when it was destroyed by other nomads. (Curiously, the Uygurs were the only Empire that adopted the Manichaeism as state religion, better known in the West as first religion of Saint Augustin). It is a bit difficult to refer to invasion of White Muslims.
In the South-West of Xinjiang, islamization came around the establishment of the Kara-Khanid Khanate in the 11 century and it was not related to forced conversions. Buddhism lasted longer in the region around Turfan maybe around the 16th century.
There was kind of a puppet state during WWII in Xinjaing, but it was more supported by the Soviets. I don't see how the Japanese could have supported the area when they did not control Gansu and Chongqing to the south. It is more when the Communists won in 1949, the Soviets had less incentives in the area.
Saying that, I think that it is a shame that British waged war on China to legalize the selling of opium and I am very sad that the first Summer Palace in Beijing was burned down by the British and French.
xie xie

RJ Hanley in reply to Fred Schaff

"...its a very good description of the situation (the best I've ever seen)..."

OK, where precisely do you stand on the bizarre "Uighers are the descendants of an invading White colonial army"? And all the other similar nonsense?

(shakes head, walks away...)

Senior Prof in reply to guest-isoimww

Bu kechii! I'm taking time to reply because you obviously wrote in good faith. First, avoid the Tocharian hypothesis. Since the National Geographic, among others, popularized some Tocharian mummies from c 1900 BCE, Uigher publicists have created online a whole world of "alternate facts," as we now call them, conflating the Uighers and Tocharians. (So-called. The name is anachronistic.) Countries have an army and a navy. These days ethnicities have publicists-- and online has been the golden age for alternate facts. Western journalists, trying to apply Western experience dealing with "minorities" accept the whole thing. As a scholar my only duty is to the verifiable or at least falsifiable statements, which we dignify with the word "facts." (Yet, it is unpleasant to find oneself acknowledging that the Beijing hardliners from whom my wife is a refugee, for once have the "facts" on their side.) As for the rest, I'm out of time. Please do re-read my cautious phrasing in the original post, which simplifies but does not falsify a thousand years of national myths, real Charlemagnes and mythic Camelots, in less than the 5000 characters the Economist grants me. Xing bu xing? Have a good weekend.

Senior Prof in reply to guest-isoimww

Bu kechii! I'm taking time to reply because you obviously wrote in good faith. First, avoid the Tocharian hypothesis. Since the National Geographic, among others, popularized some Tocharian mummies from c 1900 BCE, Uigher publicists have created online a whole world of "alternate facts," as we now call them, conflating the Uighers and Tocharians. (So-called. The name is anachronistic.) Countries have an army and a navy. These days ethnicities have publicists-- and online has been the golden age for alternate facts. Western journalists, trying to apply Western experience dealing with "minorities" accept the whole thing. As a scholar my only duty is to the verifiable or at least falsifiable statements, which we dignify with the word "facts." (Yet, it is unpleasant to find oneself acknowledging that the Beijing hardliners from whom my wife is a refugee, for once have the "facts" on their side.) As for the rest, I'm out of time. Please do re-read my cautious phrasing in the original post, which simplifies but does not falsify a thousand years of national myths, real Charlemagnes and mythic Camelots, in less than the 5000 characters the Economist grants me. Xing bu xing? Have a good weekend.

Senior Prof in reply to guest-isoimww

Bu kechii! I'm taking time to reply because you obviously wrote in good faith. First, avoid the Tocharian hypothesis. Since the National Geographic, among others, popularized some Tocharian mummies from c 1900 BCE, Uigher publicists have created online a whole world of "alternate facts," as we now call them, conflating the Uighers and Tocharians. (So-called. The name is anachronistic.) Countries have an army and a navy; ethnicities have publicists-- and online has been the golden age for alternate facts. Western journalists, trying to apply Western experience dealing with "minorities" accept the whole thing. As a scholar my only duty is to the verifiable or at least falsifiable statements, which we dignify with the word "facts." (Yet, it is unpleasant to find oneself acknowledging that the Beijing hardliners from whom my wife is a refugee, for once have the "facts" on their side.) As for the rest, I'm out of time. Please do re-read my cautious phrasing in the original post, which simplifies but does not falsify a thousand years of national myths, real Charlemagnes and mythic Camelots, in less than the 5000 characters the Economist grants me. Xing bu xing? Have a good weekend.

Fred Schaff in reply to RJ Hanley

We "Whites" left East-Africa some 60-80,000-years ago and, after raping/killing but picking-up some Genes from the Neanderthals of Europe, we continued East into Asia. (Big Smile !! but semi-serious)

guest-isoimww in reply to Senior Prof

Other scholars have taken time to compare old Uighur scripts to Tocharian ones in order to reconstruct this dead language, which must have been a challenging endeavor. Stating that the facts do not support the existence of the Tocharians is the same as accusing these linguists to have created a language out of the blue.

guest-isoimww in reply to Senior Prof

The existence of Tocharians does no rest only on the existence of the mummies... Linguists have reconstructed their language comparing texts writtent in old Uygurs with other written in Tocharians. This must have been a difficult work. Stating that their existence does not rest of facts it is accusing these linguists of having invented a language out of the blue. If it is only a work of propaganda, then they failed miserably because all my coworkers do not even know the existence of the Uigurs, so I won't comment about their knowledge of the existence of Tocharians.

alex65

I missed the article from TE with an equally inflammatory title of "The extraordinary ways in which France humiliates Muslims" when burqa was banned.