Graphic detail

Charts, maps and infographics

  • Daily chart

    How much would you pay to keep using Google?

    by THE DATA TEAM

    ONE of the great riddles about the American economy is why its growth has slowed down so much during the past few decades. Between 1946 and 1975, America’s GDP per person grew at an average annual rate of 2.3% a year. On average, it has grown by just 1.8% a year since.

    Many economists believe that national accounts may underestimate the economic significance of technological innovations. Despite the advent of the internet, smartphones and artificial intelligence, the official value added by the information industry as a share of GDP has scarcely changed since 2000. What might explain this paradox?

  • Daily chart

    A study finds nearly half of jobs are vulnerable to automation

    by THE DATA TEAM

    A WAVE of automation anxiety has hit the West. Just try typing “Will machines…” into Google. An algorithm offers to complete the sentence with differing degrees of disquiet: “...take my job?”; “...take all jobs?”; “...replace humans?”; “...take over the world?” 

    Job-grabbing robots are no longer science fiction. In 2013 Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne of Oxford University used—what else?—a machine-learning algorithm to assess how easily 702 different kinds of job in America could be automated. They concluded that fully 47% could be done by machines “over the next decade or two”.

  • Daily chart

    A typical American birth costs as much as delivering a royal baby

    by THE DATA TEAM

    A ROYAL birth is always heralded with great fanfare, and the arrival of the Duchess of Cambridge’s third baby on April 23rd was no exception. Throngs of reporters waited for updates outside the Lindo Wing, a luxurious private maternity ward in London that has often been used by the royals and which boasts a comprehensive wine list for celebrating parents.

    Yet the price of delivering the new prince, who is fifth in line to the British throne, was probably slightly less than that of an average American baby. In 2015, the Lindo Wing charged £5,670 ($8,900) for 24 hours in a deluxe room and a non-Caesarean delivery.

  • Daily chart

    Most banks won’t touch America’s legal pot industry

    by THE DATA TEAM

    IT IS often said that markets hate uncertainty. America’s marijuana industry is no exception. Earlier this year Jeff Sessions, the country’s attorney-general, rescinded a set of federal guidelines for marijuana-related businesses operating in states where the drug is legal. Now lawmakers and businesses in these states are demanding clarity for an industry that could generate as much as $11bn in revenue in 2018. The financial-services industry may be one of the largest beneficiaries of greater certainty. 

    Providing banking services to pot-sellers is a risky endeavour.

  • Daily chart

    Europeans remain welcoming to immigrants

    by THE DATA TEAM

    FOR those who believe that migration can, if managed properly, make a country materially and culturally richer, recent developments in European politics have been worrying. In many countries anti-migrant sentiment—either directed towards those from outside the European Union or against other, often poorer, EU members—has penetrated from the fringes of politics into the mainstream.

  • Daily chart

    Parents in poorer countries devote more time to their kids' homework

    by THE DATA TEAM

    HOMEWORK is the bane of a child’s life. It can also weigh heavily on parents, who either struggle to get their charges to finish it, or even worse, must brush up on their own rusty skills to help out. Parental involvement in education contributes to a child’s eventual success. A new report by the Varkey Foundation, an educational charity, shows how much time parents put in to their children’s education. The survey looked at 29 countries and found that parents in emerging economies spend much more time helping with homework than their counterparts in richer countries.

    In India, parents spend 12 hours a week on average assisting their kids—five hours longer than the global average.

  • Daily chart

    Germany is becoming more open and more fragmented

    by THE DATA TEAM

    GERMANY is changing. A country that long equated belonging with having four grandparents with German names, and treated many immigrants as temporary visitors, has seen a massive influx of foreigners following chancellor Angela Merkel’s decision in 2015 to keep borders open to refugees and asylum-seekers. Uncertainty about the country’s ability to cope with this massive influx, and about its economic future in general, has had a political cost.

    In last September’s election, Mrs Merkel’s centre-right Christian Democratic Party and its Bavarian partner, the Christian Social Union (CSU), suffered a drop in their share of the vote to a post-war low of 33%.

  • Daily chart

    The business of death is changing around the world

    by THE DATA TEAM

    EVERY minute more than 100 people die. Most of these deaths bring not just grief to some, but also profit to others. America’s 2.7m-odd deaths a year underpin an industry worth $16bn in 2017, encompassing over 19,000 funeral homes and over 120,000 employees. In France the sector is worth an estimated €2.5bn ($3.1bn). The German market was worth €1.5bn in 2014 and employed nearly 27,000 people, a sixth of them undertakers. In Britain the industry, estimated to be worth around £2bn ($2.8bn), employs over 20,000 people, a fifth of them undertakers.

    In religious countries, burial is still the norm; Ireland buries 82% of its dead, Italy 77%.

  • Daily chart

    Republicans are less divided on cultural issues than Democrats are

    by THE DATA TEAM

    DONALD TRUMP is not a traditional Republican. His breaks with the party’s orthodoxy on several issues, and above all on free trade, have caused many Republican officials and conservative intellectuals to denounce his leadership. But although most party officials have embraced the president only half-heartedly, Republican voters seem to have far fewer reservations.

  • Daily chart

    China still executes more people than anywhere else

    by THE DATA TEAM

    AMNESTY International released its annual report on death sentences and executions on April 12th. China topped the list again, by some way. Although the human-rights organisation stopped publishing China estimates in 2009 for lack of data, those available suggest thousands of people are executed annually. Iran, Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Pakistan lag behind. While 56 countries still execute people for ordinary crimes, the punishment’s prevalence has fallen. Guinea and Mongolia abolished the death penalty last year, making it 106 countries that have done so in law; 36 more have abandoned it in practice.

  • Daily chart

    Latin America’s homicide epidemic

    by THE DATA TEAM

    LATIN America boasts just 8% of the world’s population, but it accounts for 38% of its murders. The number of criminal killings in the region came to around 140,000 people last year, more than have been lost in wars around the world in almost all of the years this century. And the crime is becoming ever more common.

    Yet the continent also has some of the biggest improvers. In many Colombian cities murder used to be the leading cause of death. The rate in Cali in 1994 was 124 per 100,000, four times worse than New York at its most lethal. The mayor was a surgeon who realised that murder was like a disease.

  • Daily chart

    Illegal immigration to America is rising again

    by THE DATA TEAM

    IT CERTAINLY looked like a “Trump effect.” Within weeks of Donald Trump’s arrival at the White House in January 2017, the number of people caught crossing America’s southern border illegally fell to a 17-year low of 11,127. John Kelly, then secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), attributed the drop to Mr Trump’s executive orders on immigration. Elaine Duke, the department’s deputy secretary, gave credit to better enforcement of immigration laws. Mr Trump hailed it as “a historic and unprecedented achievement”.

    If such an effect did exist, it appears to have been short-lived.

  • Daily chart

    Viktor Orban maintains firm control of the Hungarian Parliament

    by THE DATA TEAM

    FOR the third consecutive election, Viktor Orban’s illiberal Fidesz party has won firm control of the Hungarian Parliament. With almost all of the results counted from the vote on April 8th, Fidesz appears likely to have won a two-thirds super-majority, with 133 of the chamber’s 199 seats—enough to alter the country’s constitution all by itself. Jobbik, a nationalist party that is now tacking to the centre, came second with 26 seats, and a Socialist-led coalition finished third, with 20. Most of the remainder were divided between small liberal and left-wing parties, which in many places split the anti-Fidesz vote. Turnout was 69%.

  • Daily chart

    Despite a strong economy, American states are desperate for revenue

    by THE DATA TEAM

    WITH unemployment at a 17-year low and stockmarkets near all-time highs, one might expect the coffers of American state governments to be overflowing. Yet despite these favourable economic conditions, many of them are still struggling to make ends meet. According to the National Association of State Budget Officers, 27 states saw their revenues fall below expectations in 2017. Standard & Poor’s, a credit-rating agency, has downgraded over a dozen states since 2016.

    Many of these fiscal woes can be blamed on sluggish revenue growth.

  • Daily chart

    Britain’s “gender seniority gap”

    by THE DATA TEAM

    TWO years ago the British government introduced regulations requiring all companies with at least 250 employees to provide data on the gender pay gap among their workers. The deadline for compliance expired on April 4th, after more than 10,000 firms had submitted numbers. They showed that, on average, the hourly wage for the median female employee is 12.1% less than that for the median male. (The difference at The Economist Group is 29.5%.)

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